The Washington Post discusses the great new options for street food in downtown Washington--not just hot dogs but "po' boys, pulled pork, gumbo, shawarma" and more. Sure sounds like the much-criticized D.C. government is really helping this time: The jump headline says, "With City's Help, Vendors Break the Mold." Author Tim Carman writes, "Both [new food] vendors still needed public assistance." And "the city [has] been working with vendors to give hungry Washingtonians a taste of what they want." All praise the D.C. government, font of good food. But of course the city hasn't produced the food. It hasn't subsidized the vendors. It hasn't put vendors together with investors. All it has done is to lift, in one part of the city, "regulations that have choked the life out of D.C.'s street food for decades." There are licensing rules (and a moratorium on issuing any new licenses), prohibitions on hiring employees, cart size rules, regulations on where you can park a cart at night, and so on. So the "public assistance" the vendors received was to be exempted from some of the regulations, inside a 32-block demonstration zone. It reminds me of the wisdom of Henry David Thoreau: "This government never furthered any enterprise but by the alacrity with which it got out of the way."