In the New Yorker, Nicholas Lemann frets over Ron Paul's "hostility to government" in an article titled "Enemy of the State." I wonder if Lemann, who is both a long-time writer at a great magazine and the dean of a great school of journalism, would think "Enemy of the State" was red-baiting or otherwise inappropriate language if it was applied to some other candidate. But I was especially struck by this comment in Lemann's lament about all the government programs Paul would repeal:
As for the financial crisis, Paul would have countenanced no regulation that might have prevented it, no government stabilization of the financial system after it happened, and no special help for working people hurt by it. This is where the logic of government-shrinking leads.
The famous New Yorker editing process seems to have broken down here. Here's how the paragraph should have read:
As for the financial crisis, Paul would have countenanced none of the regulation that helped to cause it, no government creation of cheap money that created the unsustainable boom, and no special help for Wall Street banks when the bubble collapsed. He would have seen that that was where the logic of government-expanding leads.