The New York Times has a long profile today of Cato's Randal O'Toole, scourge of urban planners.
But O'Toole doesn't fit the portrait of a corporate advocate. On visits to Capitol Hill, he blends in as a middle-aged, middle-height man in a dark suit -- but his beard gives him away, its shaggy twists seemingly fitting for a forest dweller. He wears a string tie that most Americans would only recognize on Colonel Sanders. His lapel doesn't carry the standard-issue flag pin but a bronze bust of his dog, Chip. The Belgian tervuren won it in a dog show. O'Toole routinely hikes and bikes dozens of miles, and he proudly announces that he has never driven a car to work. Far from living on a luxurious Virginia manor, he left his last Oregon town when it added a third stoplight. Now, from his home computer in Camp Sherman, Ore., population 300, O'Toole rails against smart-growth policies as money sponges that never calm traffic, fill seats on trains, or help the environment.
The story ends with Randal on his way to a conference in Las Vegas, which I also attended. There in the 80-degree early morning heat, he biked 50 miles each morning, on a folding bicycle that he could fit into a suitcase -- and still got back to the hotel in time to fix my Powerpoint before my speech. He's a Renaissance man.